preloader

Category: Popular

Attention Lotus Lovers!!

YOU CAN NOW DUNK & DISCOVER BISCOFF ON THE GO

It’s here!!!!! The moment you didn’t know you’ve been waiting for!

LOTUS HAVE NOW RELEASED DUNKING POTS.

I REPEAT. LOTUS COOKIE BUTTER SPREAD WITH DUNKABLE BREADSTICKS ARE NOW A THING.

Here’s proof:

A spokesman for biscoff said: “We are delighted to introduce Biscoff & Go in the UK, so that our customers can enjoy the taste of Lotus Biscoff anytime, anywhere and in a handy dunk and go format.”

Is this heaven? Image credit: Lotus / Amazon

They added: “Biscoff & Go is the perfect snack and another way in which retailers can benefit from the nation’s continued obsession with the unique caramelised flavour of Lotus Biscoff.”

They’ll retail for around £1 at local convenience stores… Perfect for when you get a craving!

Will you be trying these? ???

Attention America – this is not a biscuit!

Let’s get one thing straight. Brits LOVE biscuits. Like, we love them. Friends coming over? Whip out the biscuits. Rubbish day? Have a biscuit. Treating yourself? Biscuit. Treating someone else? Box of biscuits. So, I mean Brits are pretty much experts.

However, if you live in American and hear “biscuits and gravy”, you’ll probably picture this:

biscuits gravy
American “biscuits” and gravy
image source: Pillsbury Kitchens

Light, flaky savoury bakes smothered in creamy gravy. HOWEVER. Those in Britain will picture a whole different scene, something like this:

Britain’s “biscuits and gravy”…
image credit: Twitter user @imbadatlife

Sweet, crispy pieces, sometimes with a creamy filling, often with chocolate or vanilla flavour, and definitely never to be paired with savoury, salty brown British gravy.

So what is this madness? Why are the words so similar, yet so different across the pond???

In fact, the actual translation of biscuit means “twice cooked” – official fancy translation: the Middle French word bescuit is derived from the Latin words bis (twice) and coquere, coctus (to cook, cooked) – “twice-cooked”.

So… technically Brits version of a biscuit is closer to the real deal! More like a “cookie” as Americans known them, although Brits almost ALWAYS need a cup of tea with a biscuit. ☕

The American “biscuit” is actually similar in texture to a British scone, although (yet another difference) scones are more commonly sweet and served with jam/jelly and/or cream!

If you want to know more about the British biscuits we know and love so much (“cookies”), look no further than the below classics. From custard creams, chocolate sandwich biscuits, buttery shortbread, orange jelly sponge to jammy shortcake – there are a huge variety of different flavours and styles! ???

AND if you love seeing how other countries do their biscuits/cookies, why not take a look at one of our biscuit boxes? Sending an exciting selection of biscuits from a different country each and every month, the perfect treat, gift, or workplace pick-me-up! ???

Go on… DUNK & DISCOVER.

www.thebiscuitbaron.com/subscribe

The Perfect Gift

Whether it’s for the person that has everything, the fussy person, or that special someone that you want to show you care about – buying a gift can be a stressful time. We aim to take that stress away by giving you a gift that you can buy for all these people – biscuits with a difference…

A Biscuit Subscription Box!

After all, 93% of us Brits eat biscuits on a weekly basis and almost a quarter of us eat them daily!

via GIPHY

Here at The Biscuit Baron, we tailor our boxes each month to bring you a snapshot of a different country through the biscuits and treats that they enjoy with their cuppa.

Each box is shipped out on the 15th of the month containing between five and eight full-sized packets of biscuits. Alongside the biscuits, we like to include a little bit of information about them and where the country they come from – meaning you can even claim it’s an educational gift too!

We have featured countries such as India, The Philippines and some closer to home ones such as Belgium and The Netherlands providing a nice mix that will go great with their cup of tea, coffee or favourite cuppa.

With prices starting at just £13.33 per month (including P&P!), with no minimum term required, and with just a two-step cancellation procedure, there is a price point and plan to suit all gift occasions and budgets.

So whether it’s the foodie in the family, the jet-setting grandparents, the workplace wanderer or just the biscuit lover in your life, get them signed up in order to DUNK & DISCOVER (dunking optional!).

via GIPHY

You can sign up here. And if you enter code “GIFT” at checkout we will include a free card and message for your recipient with their first box!

Read All About Our Portuguese Box

 

October’s box sees us travel to Portugal, well-known for its port, football and Pastéis de Nata (egg custard tarts!). With a wealth of history and culture, what you may not know much about are Portugal’s biscuits! Read below to see what we selected to go into our Portugal box.

Nacional Max Strawberry Wafers


These wafers were a surprising texture! The wafer texture differed slightly from biscuits we’re used to here in the UK. Mixed with the creamy straw berry filling, we think the flavouring is reminiscent of a straw berry ice cream cone. The brand Nacional is extremely popular in Portugal, priding itself on Portuguese ingredients as per their slogan “O que e Nacional e bom” – what is national is good!

Diatosta Whole Wheat Toast


These twice baked rusk-like toasts are another item that would have been popular amongst sailors and travellers due to their ability to remain unspoilt for long periods of time. These toasts go extremely well with the topping of your choice – sweet or savoury. We tried these with the options of jam and cream cheese and both made for a delicious snack. Keep an eye out for our blog on recommended toppings!

Cuetara Ricanela Biscuits


These extremely moreish biscuits are light and, crispy with a cinnamon flavour throughout. With a sprinkling of sugar on top they are a delicious sweet treat. A firm favourite at The Biscuit Baron HQ! Slightly reminiscent of Christmas thanks to the spice used, cinnamon is actually a very popular flavouring in Portugal – and is actually used often in savoury dishes such as stews.

Bolacha Belga tipo Caseiro

Belga translates into English as Belgian and these crisp biscuit takes its inspiration from just there. Featuring the waffling texture most accustomed to Belgium and Holland although normally softer these crisp biscuits go well with any hot drink of choice. Not too sweet they make a great option if you fancy a light tea accompaniment but nothing too sickly.

Bolacha de Água e Sal

Translating as Water and Salt these water biscuits have a long history mostly favoured with sailors due to their ability to travel long distances without spoiling. These are popular in Portugal today and is perhaps an added homage to Portugal’s successful maritime history with the added sea salt ingredient.

What did you think of Portugal’s biscuit selection? Let us know – share your score card on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. 

We’ve just discovered that fizzy coffee exists, and we have one important question…

 

Cancel my usual low-foam, skinny, double-shot, extra hot with hazelnut syrup latte please. Sign me up for a fizzy coffee!

Recognise that phrase? If not, you’re not alone! We’ve just discovered carbonated coffee is a thing in the UK, and has been for a while!

This bubbly take on the traditional morning beverage actually originated in Italy, where espressos are often served with a glass of sparkling water on the side. Did anyone go full-Italian with our last box from Italy and try this with their biscuits?

In order to stay on-trend and unique, restaurants and coffee bars are even offering a serve with the likes of tonic water or lemonade.

The coffee-based drink is often sweetened slightly with fruit juice or syrup.

It does sound refreshing, and we do love discovering something new, but we have one really important question…

Can you still dunk???

What do you think of this Italian twist on your morning coffee? Have you discovered any unusual drinks you wish were brought to your hometown?

Copyright The Biscuit Baron